Rapeseed oil: nutrition and its health benefits

rapeseed oil is made of yellow rapeseed

Quite a few years ago I stopped using sunflower oil and replaced it with a healthier rapeseed oil. I remember finding a bottle of cold-pressed rapeseed oil in a supermarket and after studying its label I decided to buy it. I liked that it was suitable for a high-temperature cooking and also it seemed to be a better choice than highly refined sunflower oil. If you regularly use a sunflower oil in your kitchen, it’s about time you learn about rapeseed oil, its nutrition and health benefits.

Types of rapeseed oil

Before you buy a rapeseed oil you need to know that not all types of rapeseed oil are created equal. If it’s called ‘rapeseed oil’, it doesn’t mean it’s good for you. 

In general, there are two types of rapeseed oil – the one that has been heated and refined, and the one that has been cold-pressed.

The heated rapeseed oil is chemically treated in order to achieve the desired refined quality (odourless, light in colour). During this process, its fat profile is changed and the final product is simply a vegetable oil which had many nutrients removed and can go rancid quite easily (rancid oils are bad for your health because they introduce cancer causing free radicals into your body, without the benefit of including an antioxidant like vitamin E).

Cold-pressed rapeseed oil, on the other hand, is a much healthier version of rapeseed oil since it’s not been heavily processed. It’s more expensive than the refined version but worth buying if you care about your health.

Cold-pressed rapeseed oil properties

In summary, cold-pressed rapeseed oil has the following properties:

  • Rich in Omega 3 + 6 with nothing added or taken away
  • A good source of vitamin E
  • Wonderfully versatileCook with it, drizzle it, use it every day in many different ways
  • It doesn’t go toxic at high heat (unlike olive oil)

Rapeseed oil vs. olive oil

Comparing to the olive oil, rapeseed oil contains more omega 3 fatty acids than olive oil (10 times more actually). This doesn’t mean you should now stop using olive oil and use rapeseed oil instead, not at all. Each of the oils has its place in cooking and food preparation. 

Extra virgin olive oil is especially great in salad dressings and for drizzling on top of the food – using rapeseed oil instead just wouldn’t work the same. 

Rapeseed oil is good to use for things like roasting, frying and baking since extra virgin olive oil is not suitable for high-temperature cooking (high temperatures modifies its molecules and degrade its quality).

When looking at the amount of saturated fat each oil contains, we can see that rapeseed oil contains over half the amount of saturated fat of olive oil. Both oils contain Vitamin E, but it’s the rapeseed oil which contains more. They certainly both have the place in the kitchen, just use them accordingly.

Rapeseed oil health benefits

Due to the low amount of saturated (or ‘bad’)  fats, rapeseed oil is one of the healthiest oils you could use in cooking and diet, especially if you need to watch your cholesterol levels. Being rich in omega 3 fatty acids it contributes to your daily intake of these ‘essential’ fats, helping you to lower your risk of heart disease and also lower inflammation in a body.
It also contributes to your daily intake of vitamin E – a powerful antioxidant helping to slow down processes which damage cells. One spoon of cold-pressed rapeseed oil will give you 24% of your recommended daily allowance of vitamin E. Isn’t this enough reasons for you to start using this oil today?

Where to buy cold-pressed rapeseed oil

Luckily, today you can buy cold-pressed rapeseed oil in all the major supermarkets, including Aldi. You can also get it from places like Whole Foods Market and Amazon, of course. Remember, if this is the kind of oil you would use a lot, it’s worth buying it in bulk to save yourself some money (but remember to store it properly so that it doesn’t get spoiled).

What oil do you use for cooking? Have you tried rapeseed oil yet?

References:

http://www.healthy-eating-politics.com/vegetable-oil.html
https://dietingwell.com/is-rapeseed-oil-healthy/

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